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Guide to Resources on the Slavonic Languages  

Last Updated: Sep 19, 2016 URL: http://libguides.ucl.ac.uk/slavonic Print Guide RSS Updates
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General Resources

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Guide to Resources on the Slavonic Languages

The General Slavonic section, which formed the nucleus of the School's early collection, consists of material dealing with Old Slavonic or Old Church Slavonic philology, the starting point for the study of the history of the Slavonic languages. It contains general grammars and monographs in the Slavonic languages and in English, French and German on various aspects of the language and its later development by such well-known Slavists as Robert Auty, Charles E. Bidwell, Henry Birnbaum, Reginald de Bray, August Leskien, Horace G. Lunt, Roman Jakobson, Antoine Meillet, Grigore Nandris, Aleksander Brückner, Jan Baudoin de Courtenay, and George Shevelov.

The section also contains works in Slavonic and West European languages on the early history of the Slavs and their relations with the Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman Empires and with the Germanic world, and on the spread of Christianity and the development of religious and cultural life in Central, Southern and Eastern Europe.

The Library has runs of long-standing periodicals specialising in these subjects: Le Monde slave, Paris, 1917-1938; Slavonic and East European Review, published by the School since 1922; (American) Slavic Review, Stanford, CA, 1941- ; Rocznik slawistyczny, Kraków, 1908- (early years incomplete); Archiv für slavische Philologie, Berlin, 1876-1929; Zeitschrift für slavische Philologie, Leipzig, since 1925, and Heidelberg, since 1951; Slavia, Prague, 1922-; Byzantinoslavica, 1929- .

The General Slavonic collection is shelved on the Lower Ground Floor of the Library. Books in this section have the classmark Gen.Slav.

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